Firingsculpture | News
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18 Oct Two sculls with marks from swords

In a week I will meet with the group with which I will make the firing sculpture that I have been preparing for the last 4 months. I decided to use a local clay to strengthen the archeological angle of the project. That has meant a lot of testing. We will build right at the lake, only 100 m from where the archaeologists are still digging. Just yesterday when I passed there, they had made exceptional finds: Two sculls with marks from swords.

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05 Sep New firingsculpture at Alken Enge

I will make a new firingsculpture at Alken Enge, near Skanderborg in Denmark. I am right now looking for assistants. The project will relate to archaeology and and Army and past war rituals in the iron age.

The Alken Enge’ (English: Alken Meadows) wetlands near Lake Mossø at Skanderborg in East Jutland,Denmark is the site of a recent massive archaeological excavation. The skeletal remains of hundreds of Iron Agewarriors, have recently been found in what was likely a lake bed when the remains were placed there about 2000 years ago. Excavation Project Manager Mads Kähler Holst, professor of archaeology at Aarhus University, has been quoted as saying of finding the remains of a violent conflict at the 40 hectare site: “It’s clear that this must have been a quite far-reaching and dramatic event, that must have had profound effect on the society of the time. The dig has produced a large quantity of skeletal remains, and we believe that they will give us the answers to some of our questions about what kind of events led up to the army ending up here.”[1]
The wet meadows of Alken Enge, forms the lower part of the short river valley of Illerup Ådal.
http://www.skanderborgmuseum.dk/Press_Releases-1085.aspx

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